Judges

Professional JournalistsBeginner JournalistsAll articles Beginner Journalists

13 Jan

Hanna Yankuta (Belarus)
Kultura Enter, April 3, 2013


502

Discovering a town

Please see Polish below - 

Discovering the city

Relations between Belarusian literature and a city have always been very complicated. In this unequal marriage, literature repeatedly ran to its endless lovers – a town, a farm, a village – leaving the city in none too good a plight. But the city was waiting. The distrust to the city as a place, where nothing good can happen, rendered by uncle Antos after his famous trip to Vilnius described by Yakub Kolas in the poem “The New Land” (1923), was lovingly carried by Belarusian literature almost through the whole 20th century. The forest is good because in the forest you can find partisans; the village is good because connection to the land is not lost there and traditional values are maintained, and the city ... The city is something strange, there is a lot of noise and din there, it sucks the lifeblood out of humans, it generally does not exist, it is a mythical space from which bosses come to the village to sort things out and clean the mess up.

Fragile steps towards reconciliation of cities and villages started in the middle of the 20th century. In 1966 it was published a collection of prose by Mikhas StraltsouHay on the Pavement”, in which the main character, a recent villager, was trying to get used to urban reality, understand it and reconcile in himself two souls, the embodiments of which have become hay and pavement. The concept of “hay on the pavement” has entrenched in Belarusian literature so firmly that almost fifty years later a literary festival in honour of Straltsou, which last year was held in Minsk and is dedicated to the urban poetry (other types are not so easy to find in Belarusian literature now), was named “Poems on the Pavement”. The epoch of “hay” slowly passed but lasted quite a long time – and long enough was determining that “strange war” between cities and villages which the literature could reconcile in no way.

The time of the city in Belarusian literature began in the 1990s. The urban prose, though not as important as all these village chronicles, came to the fore and to this day does not hand over its positions: the city is taking revenge on the village in full for all the years of obscurity and rejection. In addition, the story of Andrey Fedarenka “Village” appears, it still happens sometimes that the characters leave the city and travel outside the ringway, but the core of traditional culture, the role of which for the writers of the 20th century played the village, now appears in the literature almost as an atavism. And the environment as such no longer exists: the village has become a place where time has stopped, now there is nothing worthy of attention happening in the village because there are living out their days old people and are floating on the waves of life those who cannot swim against the current, that is, move somewhere to a more favourable location. And it is not surprising at all that the literature finally dumped the village and moved to where things are humming and where someone still needs it. It moved to the city.

Minsk versus Vilnius: the capital which does not exist

Despite the fact that Minsk became the capital of Belarus (or at least the country that more or less corresponds to the today’s Republic of Belarus) almost a hundred years ago, Belarusian literature didn’t pay any special attention to it, as well as to any other city, until recently. It is much easier to remember Belarusian pieces of work, in titles of which one can find, for example, Paris (“Destroy Paris” by Valyantsin Akudovich or “Fatigued by Paris” by Leanid Dranko-Maysyuk) than the name of Minsk. Of course, here, in the capital, the actions of many pieces of works of the Soviet period are happening but in none of them attention is paid to what could be the spirit of the city or its myth. Minsk is a city of gray stories and gray landscapes, it is mundane as the Stalin’s empire style on Independence Avenue (the former Frantsysk Skarina Avenue) or as the Palace of the Republic on October Square. To create an image of Minsk on the basis of works of literature of the Soviet era is impossible: it’s indistinct and is deprived of any specificity. The only thing we know about it is that it is a hero-city. That during the war (again war!) there were undergrounders here as well as lived Merchant and Poet (the novel of the same name by Ivan Shamyakin): there can be a little more fragmentary information, if you try to find it. And if Grodna is a small Paris (Paris again!), when Nyasvizh is haunted by the ghost of Czornaja Panna Barbara Radziwill, when Polotsk is a city of St. Euphrosyne and St. Sophia Cathedral, Minsk is a city with a riddle which they started to solve recently.

One of the most interesting and comprehensive myths or even one of quite formed images of Minsk appeared in the photo album of Artur Klinau “City of the Sun” (2006), which includes about a hundred photographs and an essay of the same name, where it is proved that Minsk is an ideal illustration of the “The City of the Sun” by Tommaso Campanella, the world’s only Ideal City of the communist utopia, a solid product of the Soviet era, the analogue of which cannot be found anywhere else. The value of Minsk according to Artur Klinau’s view, lies in the fact that only it was able to embody (especially in architecture) the master plan of the Communist Party on urban planning. Developing his theory further, two years later, Artur Klinau published the novel “A Small Road-Book around the City of the Sun”, an attempt to comprehend the Minsk myth. Quite on the contrary, this city is discovered in the last year’s novel of Uladzimir Nyaklyayeu “Soda Machine with and without Syrup”, which has a subtitle “Minsk novel”. The literature finally puts Minsk on the cover, but if Klinau tries to tell about Minsk which exists, or at least tries to imagine it, Nyaklyayeu describes Minsk which no longer exists, and the literature is the only place where the city disappeared after the war can now exist. And when there is no Minsk, there is nothing left but to take what has left of it, as Maryya Martysevich noted in her review to the novel “Soda machine with and without syrup”: to take residents of Minsk. Here the writer’s concept is somewhat close to the idea that Valyantin Akudovich expressed in the essay “The City which Does Not Exist”. According to Akudovich, Minsk is deprived of poetic dominant, that point of reference in the system of the spatial coordinates from which the literature could push away, and the idea as well, that is why it is a city without a soul. Minsk does not have its Eiffel Tower, the Wawel Palace or at least Polotsk’s St. Sophia Cathedral, that is why Minsk can only exist within each of its residents who consciously decide for themselves whether they want to be here or not, and as a result, this city has meaning only if this sense is seen by its inhabitants. The characters of Uladzimir Nyaklyaeu see this sense, the characters of Algerd Bakharevich, the author of another of last year’s novel “Shabany”, named after an ill-famed outlying district of Minsk, do not see, that is why by any means are escaping from there, only much later realizing that neither from gloomy Shabany nor from Minsk they won’t be able to escape.

But according to Valyantin Akudovich, Minsk is not the only place that does not exist. There is also no Vilnius, a city that is so closely connected with the history of Belarus that modern Belarusian literature treats it as its spiritual Mecca. Today a drive from Minsk to Vilnius takes three hours, and even if there was not published the first Belarusian newspaper “Nasha Niva” and did not live many leaders of the Belarusian national revival, Belarusians, regularly visiting the Lithuanian capital for purchases in “Akropolis” or for recreation purposes, or for the concert of Lyavon Volski entered in the “black list”, still would have come up with some legend to make this city even a little bit theirs. As it was mentioned above, the uncle Antos, the character of the poem of Yakub Kolas “New Land”, visited Vilnius, and he didn’t like it at all, which did not stop Belarusians from grabbing Vilnius like a lifebuoy as soon as it became possible, that is, let’s say in the 1990s. Actions of many pieces of works of modern Belarusian literature take place exactly there, and it’s apparent that in the near future the trend won’t change. Vilnius seems to be almost a mystical city, a place where supernatural events can occur, for example, traveling in time, both in the works of writers of the older and younger generation. “In Vilnius Veritas” is the name of the collected book of works written by the finalists of the competition of young writers to the 100th anniversary of “Nasha Niva”, published in 2007, and no matter how hard the authors of the collected book tried to desacralize the myth about Vilnius as the Belarusian Atlantis (“See Vilnius and ... hoot with laughter” by Siroshka Pistonchyk), the fact remains: in Belarusian literature in Vilnius is really veritas.

In the same essay “The city which does not exist” Valyantin Akudovich at the background of all this almost mystical worship considers Vilnius as a trap city. He claims that Vilnius for a long time gave and still gives to Belarusians a hope to finally get a cultural capital which will have its own peculiarities and its soul, but centuries go, and the hope never comes true. Belarusian writers continue to settle their characters and lyrical characters in Vilnius, send them there to have adventures and experience love, but Vilnius doesn’t become more Belarusian because of that. Belarusian Vilnius is a frozen project which is at the stage of the eternal progress.

City of broken windows

Dislike of the city, which in many cases transformed in total disregard, in the end of the 20th century, resulted in a rather unexpected form. Despite of the fact that many more writers who were born and raised in the city and therefore did not have any emotional ties with the village came to literature, in a number of works of modern Belarusian literature the city never ceases to be a monster and is demonized even more. In a new, even more terrible shape it appears on the pages of novels or short stories not incidentally, not as a casual mention: its image attracts more of authors’ attention and occupies more space in the works. Now it is not villagers but indigenous citizens which perceive themselves as children of the streets, of pavement where it can no longer be any hay, who treat their city with caution.

The cult novel of the late 1990s “To Love Night is the Right of Rats” by Yury Stankevich, full of black humour, xenophobia and gloomy apocalyptic predictions, describes an image of the fictional provincial town Yanausk, uncomfortable and disordered, which gives its residents no chance for a decent life, and that is why associated with swamp. All descriptions of scenes of Yanausk are exclusively negative: broken windows, trash in the streets, fallen fences. The reason for this decline the author sees in the historical circumstances and primarily in the betrayal of the national idea. The image of swamp appears in the collected book of stories by Yeva Vezhnavets “The Way of the Petty Bastards” (2008) and is enshrined in the works of Algerd Bakharevich. However, it is quite another swamp than Yury Stankevich’s. In fact, it is a delayed reaction to the officious Soviet literature and works, in which Belarusian reality is sugared up: everything that is Belarusian is good. The so-called “breaking glass in your own house” (an expression that appeared during the hot discussions in the media and which means refusing to consider Belarusian things as a value only on the basis of using concepts of “native”, “motherland”, “traditional”) couldn’t result in something good for the city. The young generation of writers refused to admire Belarus, its history and culture mechanically, simply because this is the way it is done, consciously tried to destroy old patterns, literary cliches and look at the reality from a new perspective. Destruction of all possible myths about Belarus and its literary desacralization was favoured by the political situation in the country when writers used all possible means to emphasize the irregularity and the absurdity of life in the new environment. As it was expected, the first reaction was rather critical, which resulted in the city turning into a terrible, dangerous and cursed (“Damned Guests of the Capital” by Algerd Bakharevich) place. However, today this concept is gradually disappearing from the literature, and even in the novel “Shabany” dedicated to the most gloomy district of Minsk, the city, with all its demonic things, becomes a mystical formation, where there happen though terrible but, nevertheless, miracles. In the works of the younger generation of Belarusian writers, who have became part of the literature very recently, the image of the city-demon is perceived with a large portion of irony and brought to the point of absurdity. Now, when all windows “in your own house” as well as in the city are broken, old myths are destroyed and values are reconsidered, there is only one thing left – to invent something new.

The city has everything

Today in the city, if what Belarusian literature says is true, you can find absolutely everything. Next to apocalyptic paintings depicting decay occur bright, sometimes carnival, sometimes just funny and memorable images. This happened before, even for advice: take, for example, the novel of Uladzimir Karatkevich “Christ Landed in Garodnya” (1972), where the city if not the protagonist but is so important that the author found it necessary to put it in the headline. In historical literature cities play a very interesting role in general – they become a scenery for swindlers’ adventures (historical novels in Belarusian literature mostly have this character of adventures), they are regarded as scenes of action, and therefore require special decoration. Now almost the same way Belarusian cities are decorated during chivalry festivals. The theatrical character of the city is manifested in any historical novels, no matter when they were written: by Uladzimir Karatkevich in the 1970s, by Genryh Dalidovich in the 1990s or or Lyudmila Rubleuskaya in the 2000s.

In the poetry of Andrey Khadanovich, the city, be it even Berlin (“Berlibry”, 2008), even Paris, even any single Belarusian city (“Countrymen, or Belarusian Limericks”, 2005), is a post-modern warehouse of speeches, quotations, contexts of others. Everything is there, even three-stringed guitars, skates for the short-sighted and antitank galoshes (“To Go and not Return”). Images of such multilevel and multicontextual cities appear in the poetry of the younger generation. A special place takes the concept of motion – a modern city in the Belarusian poetry does not allow a person to stand still, everything is moving there, metro, buses, trams, poets route the city, defining stops in accordance with their own aesthetic views.

A completely unexpected image of the city is displayed in the works of Syargey Balakhonau. In the novel “The Name of the Pear” (2005), it is almost the same postmodernist and multicoloured locus, as in the poetry of Andrey Khadanovich, with the only difference lying in that the concept of the city by Syargey Balakhonau is more integral – it is a “shkutsyanka” (comes from the mentioned in the novel name of blankets made from various pieces[1]) of meanings, kaleidoscope which, depending on the point of view, can show different images. Any interpretation of this mystical formation becomes the object of the author’s irony, and the image of the city is deprived of all meanings imposed to it by predecessors. In the new book “The Earth under the Wings of the Phoenix” (2012), written in cinematic genre of mockumentary, Syargey Balakhonau again displays ironic, almost carnival images of cities where the most unbelievable may happen. The city is transformed into a training ground for miracles and at the same time into one of the reasons for undervaluing the notions which are incompatible with the total irony of the postmodern era. It is the same breaking of the windows but without psychotherapeutic purposes, with elements of play with all senses and cultural values, one step forward, which certainly suggests further movement.

 

***

Bursting through into the literature after a long silence, the city more and more confidently consolidates its position. The interest in urban prose is increasing, and the more works are written on this topic, the greater the interest is. For example, recently, particularly popular becomes the subject of military Minsk: memories and other documentary works about life in the Belarusian capital occupied by German troops are actively read and discussed on the Internet. The Minsk of the 1960s becomes one of the characters of the novel by Uladzimir Nyaklyaeu “Soda Machine with and without Syrup” and appears on the pages of the documentary book by Alyaksandr Lukashuk “The Trace of a Butterfly” (2011, short list of the literary prize in honour of Jerzy Giedroyc), though more as a background to the story with the way of life of Lee Harvey Oswald in the Belarusian capital. In the novel of Uladzimir Nyaklyaeu the latter, by the way, appears under the nickname American, unexpectedly becoming one of the symbols of the Minsk of the 1960s. However, discovering the city in Belarusian literature has not stopped: it is obvious that the subject is far from being depleted, and for a long time will be giving the writers of different generations plenty of space for reflection.

Translations into Polish:

Uładzimir Karatkiewicz. Chrystus wylądował w Grodnie. Oficyna 21.

Nie chyliłem czoła przed mocą: Antologia poezij białoruskiej od XV do XX wieku. Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego.

Pępek nieba. Antologia współczesnej poezji białoruskiej. Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego.

Suplement poetycki ze współczesnej liryki białoruskiej. Dom Kultury „Śródmieście”.

Andrej Chadanowicz. Święta Nowego Rocku. Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego.

Alhierd Bacharewicz. Talent do jąkania się. Opowiadania wybrane. Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego.

Artur Klinau. Mińsk. Przewodnik po Mieście Słońca. Czarne.

Ihar Babkou. Królestwo Białoruś. Interpretacja ru(i)n. Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego.



[1] Shkut in Belarusian means “piece of something”

Poszukując miasta

Związek białoruskiej literatury z miastem nigdy nie był prosty. W tej nierównej relacji literatura niejednokrotnie uciekała do swoich niezliczonych kochanków miasteczek, chutorów, wiosek, porzucając miasto w sytuacji nie do pozazdroszczenia. Jednak miasto czekało. Brak zaufania w stosunku do niego jako miejsca, gdzie nic dobrego wydarzyć się nie może, wzbudzony u wuja Antosia po słynnej podróży do Wilna, opisanej przez Jakuba Kołasa w poemacie Nowa ziemia[1] (1923), literatura białoruska czule zachowała przy sobie niemal przez cały wiek XX. Las jest dobrym miejscem akcji, bo działają tam partyzanci. Wioska również, ponieważ tam nie traci się kontaktu z ziemią i zachowuje tradycyjne wartości. A miasto… Miasto to coś niepojętego,  miejsce, gdzie panuje hałas i zgiełk, które wysysa z człowieka życie; ono w ogóle nie istnieje, to mityczna przestrzeń, skąd do wioski przyjeżdżają wysocy rangą naczelnicy, żeby zorientować się w sytuacji i zaprowadzić porządek.

Nieśmiałe kroki w kierunku pojednania miasta i wsi zaczęto podejmować w połowie XX wieku. W 1966 roku ukazał się zbiór prozy Michasia Stralcoua Siena na asfalcie[2] (Siano na asfalcie), w którym bohater, do niedawna mieszkaniec wsi, próbuje oswoić się z miejską rzeczywistością, nadać jej sens i zjednać w sobie dwie dusze, których ucieleśnieniem są siano i asfalt. Koncepcja „siana na asfalcie” zakorzeniła się w białoruskiej literaturze tak silnie, że po upływie niemal pięćdziesięciu lat Festiwal Literacji imienia Stralcoua, który od ubiegłego roku ma swoje miejsce w Mińsku, a poświęcony jest miejskiej poezji (inną w białoruskiej literaturze znaleźć trudno), otrzymał nazwę „Vierszy na asfalcie”[3] („Wiersze na asfalcie”). Epoka „siana” po cichu przeminęła, jednak utrzymywała się dosyć długo i wyznaczała ową „dziwną wojnę” miasta i wioski, których literatura w żaden sposób nie mogła pojednać.

Czas sprzyjający miastu w białoruskiej literaturze nadszedł w latach dziewięćdziesiątych. Urbanistyczna proza, chociaż nie tak doniosła jak wszystkie wiejskie kroniki, pojawiła się na pierwszym planie i do dzisiaj broni swojej pozycji: Miasto mści się na wiosce za wszystkie lata zapomnienia i zaniedbania. Wprawdzie powstała jeszcze opowieść Andreja Fiedarenki Vioska[4] (Wioska), zdarza się, że bohaterowie opuszczają miasto, jednak ten ośrodek tradycyjnej kultury, jakim była dla pisarzy XX-wieczna wioska, przejawia się obecnie w literaturze jedynie jako atawizm. Nawet samego ośrodka tradycyjnej kultury już nie ma: wioska stała się miejscem, gdzie czas się zatrzymał. Dzisiaj na wsi nie dzieje się nic godnego uwagi. Dożywają tam swoich dni starzy ludzie oraz ci, którzy nie są w stanie płynąć pod prąd, to znaczy egzystować w bardziej dogodnym miejscu. Nie dziwi zatem fakt, że literatura wreszcie porzuciła wioskę i przeniosła się tam, gdzie wiruje życie i gdzie jest jeszcze komuś potrzebna. Przeniosła się do miasta.

Mińsk versus Wilno: stolica, której nie ma

Mimo że Mińsk stał się stolicą Białorusi (czy chociażby kraju, który mniej więcej odpowiada dzisiejszej Republice Białorusi) niemal sto lat temu, do niedawna białoruska literatura zarówno Mińska, jak i żadnego innego miasta nie obdarzała szczególną uwagą. O wiele łatwiej wymienić białoruskie utwory, w których tytułach występował na przykład Paryż: Razburyć Paryż[5] (Zburzyć Paryż) Valancina Akudovicza czy Stomlienasć Paryżam[6] (Zmęczenie Paryżem) Lieanida Drańko-Majsiuka. Oczywiście w Mińsku, w stolicy, rozgrywa się akcja wielu utworów z czasów sowieckich, ale żaden z nich nie bierze pod uwagę tego, co mogłoby stać się duchem miasta czy jego mitem. Mińsk to miasto szarych opowieści i szarych krajobrazów. Jest całkiem codzienny, jak stalinowski empire na prospekcie Niezalieżnaści [Niepodległości] (byłym prospekcie Francyska Skaryny) czy jak Pałac Republiki na placu Kastrycznickim. Niemożliwe jest stworzenie obrazu Mińska na podstawie utworów literatury epoki sowieckiej: rozpływa się i traci wszelką konkretność. Jedyne, co o nim wiem, to fakt, że jest miastem-bohaterem, że w czasie wojny (znów wojna!) byli tu działacze podziemia, mieszkali również Handlarka i Poeta (jest opowieść o takim tytule Ivana Szamiakina[7]). Fragmentarycznych informacji można jeszcze trochę podać. I podczas gdy Grodno to maleńki Paryż (znów Paryż!), gdy w Nieświeżu błąka się zjawa Czarnej Damy Barbary Radziwiłłówny, gdy Połock to miasto świętej Jeufrasinni i Soboru Mądrości Bożej w Połocku, zwanego też soborem św. Zofii, Mińsk jawi się jak miasto-zagadka, której tajemnicę zaczęto odkrywać całkiem niedawno.

Jeden z najciekawszych i najbardziej spójnych mitów, czy też już właściwie ukształtowanych wizerunków, Mińska zaprezentowany jest w albumie fotograficznym Artura Klinaua Horad SONca[8] (Miasto słońca, 2006), zawierającym około stu fotografii oraz esej, o tym samym tytule, w którym autor dowodzi, że Mińsk jest idealną ilustracją do Miasta słońca Tomasza Campanelli, jako jedyne w świecie Miasto Idealne komunistycznej utopii, jednolity produkt epoki sowieckiej, niemający sobie podobnych. Wartość Mińska, według Artura Klinaua, polega właśnie na tym, że jako jedyne miasto zdołał urzeczywistnić (przede wszystkim w swojej architekturze) plan generalny partii komunistycznej wobec urbanistycznego progresu. Rozwijając swoją teorię przez następne dwa lata, Artur Klinau wydał powieść Mińsk. Przewodnik po Mieście Słońca[9] próbę znalezienia sensu mińskiego mitu. Całkowicie z innej strony miasto to ujawnia się w powieści Uladzimira Niaklajeva Autamat z haziroukaj z siropam i biez[10] (Automat z wodą gazowaną z sokiem, albo bez), która ukazała się w ubiegłym roku, z podtytułem: Minski raman (Mińska powieść). Literatura wreszcie wynosi Mińsk na okładkę, ale podczas gdy Klinau próbuje opowiedzieć o mieście, które istnieje, lub je wymyślić, Niaklajeu opisuje Mińsk, którego już nie ma. Jedynie w literaturze to miasto, które odeszło w czasach powojennych, może istnieć. Bo gdy Mińska już nie ma, należy przyjąć to, co po nim zostało. Jak zaznaczyła w recenzji powieści Autamat z haziroukaj z siropam i biez Maryja Martysievicz pozostaje przyjąć mińszczan. Tutaj ujawnia się koncepcja podobna do myśli, którą Valancin Akudovicz przedstawił w eseju Miasto, którego nie ma[11]. Według niego Mińsk jest pozbawiony poetyckiej dominanty, tego punktu odniesienia w systemie przestrzeni współrzędnych, na którym mogłaby się oprzeć literatura, a także wyobraźnia dlatego jest to miasto pozbawione duszy. Mińsk nie ma własnej wieży Eiffla, Zamku Wawelskiego czy chociażby świątyni Hagia Sophia, właśnie dlatego miasto to może istnieć jedynie we wnętrzu każdego mieszkańca, który świadomie decyduje, czy chce tu być, czy nie. W konsekwencji miasto posiada sens tylko wtedy, gdy dostrzegają go ludzie. Bohater Uładzimira Niaklajeva ten sens widzi, bohaterowie Alhierda Bacharevicza, autora kolejnej zeszłorocznej powieści Szabany[12], nazwanej tak od dzielnicy, o kiepskiej reputacji, na obrzeżach Mińska nie dostrzegają go, dlatego stąd uciekają, dopiero o wiele później, zdając sobie sprawę z tego, że ani od zmęczonych Szaban, ani od samego Mińska uwolnić się nie zdołają.

Jednak, według Valancina Akudowicza, Mińsk to niejedyne miejsce, którego nie ma. Nie ma także  Wilna, tak silnie związanego z historią Białorusi, że współczesna literatura białoruska traktuje je jak swoją duchową Mekkę. Dziś dojechać z Mińska do Wilna można w trzy godziny. Dlatego nawet jeśli nie tam wydawana byłaby pierwsza białoruska gazeta „Nasza Niwa” i nie tam mieszkałoby wielu działaczy białoruskiego odrodzenia, Białorusini, regularnie przyjeżdżając do litewskiej stolicy a to po zakupy w „Akropolisie”, a to w celu odpoczynku, a to na koncert umieszczonego na „czarnej liście” Liavona Volskiego i tak wymyśliliby jakąś legendę, aby sprawić, by to miasto było choć troszeczkę ich. Jak już wspomniano, wuj Antoś bohater poematu Jakuba Kołasa Nowa ziemia Wilno odwiedził, ale zdecydowanie nie przypadło mu do gustu. Nie powstrzymało to Białorusinów, żeby chwycić się Wilna jak koła ratunkowego od razu po tym, gdy stało się to możliwe, czyli w latach dziewięćdziesiątych. Akcja wielu utworów współczesnej literatury białoruskiej rozgrywa się właśnie tam. I wszystko wskazuje na to, że tendencja ta w najbliższym czasie nie zaniknie. Zarówno w twórczości pisarzy starszego, jak i młodszego pokolenia Wilno wyobrażane jest jak miasto niemal mistyczne, miejsce, gdzie dochodzi do nadprzyrodzonych wydarzeń, na przykład podróży w czasie. In Vilnia veritas to tytuł tomu finalistów konkursu młodych literatów wydanego z okazji stulecia istnienia „Naszej Niwy”, który ukazał się w 2007 roku. Autorzy próbowali desakralizować mit o Wilnie jako białoruskiej Atlantydzie (Pabaczyć Vilniu i… prażać[13]  – Zobaczyć Wilno i…brechać Siroszki Pistonczyka). Fakt jednak pozostaje faktem w białoruskiej literaturze in Wilno naprawdę veritas.

Valancin Akudowicz w tymże eseju (Miasto, którego nie ma) na tle niemal mistycznej adoracji postrzega Wilno jako miasto-pułapkę. Stwierdza, że przez długi czas dawało i nadal daje nadzieję Białorusinom na uzyskanie miana stolicy kultury, która wyróżniałaby się oryginalnością i miała duszę. Lecz mijają stulecia, a nadzieja i tak się nie spełnia. Białoruscy pisarze ciągle osadzają swoich bohaterów i podmioty liryczne w Wilnie, aby przeżywali przygody i doznawali uczuć, ale przez to Wilno nie robi się bardziej białoruskie. Białoruskie Wilno to zamrożony projekt, który znajduje się w wiecznym stadium opracowywania.

Miasto wybitych okien

Niechęć do miasta, która w wielu przypadkach przeradzała się w całkowitą ignorancję, doprowadziła w końcu wieku XX do dość niespodziewanych konsekwencji. Mimo że do grona literatów zaczęło należeć coraz więcej osób, które urodziły się i dorastały w mieście i dlatego nie były emocjonalnie związane z wsią, w wielu utworach najnowszej literatury białoruskiej miasto pozostaje poczwarą i w coraz większym stopniu ulega demonizacji. W nowym, jeszcze bardziej przerażającym wizerunku pojawia się na stronach powieści czy opowiadań już nieprzypadkowo: jego obraz przyciąga coraz więcej uwagi autorów i zajmuje coraz więcej miejsca w utworach. Obecnie nie mieszkańcy wsi, ale miasta, którzy czują się dziećmi asfaltu, na którym już nie może być żadnego siana, odnoszą się do swojego miasta z rezerwą.

W kultowej powieści końca lat dziewięćdziesiątych Liubić nocz – prava pacukou[14] (Kochać noc – prawo pająków) Jurego Stankiewicza, pełnej ohydy, ksenofobii i ciemnych apokaliptycznych przepowiedni, wyrasta obraz wymyślonego prowincjonalnego miasteczka Janauska, pozbawionego swojskości i chaotycznego, które nie daje swoim mieszkańcom żadnej szansy na godne życie i kojarzy im się z bagnem. Wszystkie opisy pejzażu Janauska pokazują wyłącznie negatywne aspekty: rozbite okna, śmieci na ulicach, połamane ogrodzenia. Przyczynę upadku autor upatruje w okolicznościach historycznych, a przede wszystkim w zdradzie idei narodowej. Obraz błota znajduje się także w tomie opowiadań Evy Vieżnaviec Szliach drobnaj svolaczy[15] (Szlak drobnej swołoczy, 2008) i jest mocno akcentowany w twórczości Alhierda Bacharevicza. Jednak jest to zupełnie inne błoto niż u Jurego Stankiewicza. Właściwie jest to spóźniona odpowiedź na oficjalną literaturę sowiecką i na utwory, w których białoruska rzeczywistość jest idealizowana, a wszystko co białoruskie jest dobre. W wyniku tak zwanego wybijania szyb w rodzimym domu (wyrażenie to pojawiło się w burzliwych debatach, które ogarnęły media; oznacza zaprzeczenie „białoruskości” zawierającej się w takich pojęciach, jak: „rodzime”, „ojczyste”, „tradycyjne”) miasto nie mogło nie ucierpieć. Młoda generacja pisarzy odeszła od biernego zachwytu nad Białorusią jej historią, kulturą jedynie na podstawie tego, że tak jest przyjęte; próbowała świadomie obalić wcześniejsze modele, literackie wzorce i spojrzeć na rzeczywistość z nowego punktu widzenia. Obaleniu wszystkich możliwych mitów o Białorusi oraz jej literackiej desakralizacji sprzyjała sytuacja polityczna w kraju; pisarze wykorzystywali wszystkie możliwe sposoby, żeby podkreślić nieprawidłowości i absurd życia w nowych warunkach. Jak można było przewidzieć, pierwsze reakcje okazały się wyjątkowo ostre, w wyniku czego miasto w literaturze zmieniło się w miejsce straszne, niebezpieczne i przeklęte (Prakliatyja Hosci stalicy[16] Przeklęci goście stolicy Algierda Bacharevicza). Jednak obecnie koncepcja ta powoli zanika w literaturze. I nawet w powieści Szabany, poświęconej najbardziej mrocznej mińskiej dzielnicy, miasto przy całej swojej demoniczności staje się pewnym mistycznym tworem, gdzie mają miejsce, może i straszne, ale jednak cuda. W twórczości najmłodszego pokolenia białoruskich pisarzy, którzy weszli do literatury dosłownie w ostatnich latach, wizerunek miasta-demona przyjmowany jest już z dużą ironią i doprowadzany do absurdu. Dzisiaj, kiedy wszystkie okna w „rodzimym domu” są wybite, stare mity obalone, a wartości zweryfikowane, pozostaje jedno wymyślić coś nowego.

W mieście wszystko jest

Obecnie w mieście, jeśli wierzyć białoruskiej literaturze, można znaleźć absolutnie wszystko. Obok apokaliptycznych wizji truchła i rozpadu spotyka się też jasne, czasem fantazyjne, a czasem po prostu wesołe obrazy. Zdarzało się to także wcześniej, nawet za czasów Sowietów, o czym świadczy na przykład powieść Uładzimira Karatkiewicza Chrystus wylądował w Grodnie[17] (1972), w której miasto może nie jest głównym bohaterem, ale jest ważne na tyle, że autor uważał za konieczne umieszczenie go w tytule. W literaturze historycznej miasta w ogóle odgrywają bardzo ciekawą rolę służą za tło dla awanturniczych przygód (powieści historyczne w literaturze białoruskiej mają przede wszystkim charakter przygodowy), traktowane są jak drugi plan dla akcji, dlatego wymagają specjalnej ozdoby. Dla przykładu, w taki sposób obecnie upiększa się białoruskie miasta w czasie festiwalów rycerskich. Teatralny charakter miasta przejawia się w każdej powieści historycznej, niezależnie od tego, kiedy zostały napisane: u Uładzimira Karatkievicza w latach siedemdziesiątych, u Henryka Dalidovicza dziewięćdziesiątych czy u Ludmiły Rublieuskiej w 2000 roku.

W poezji Andreja Chadanovicza miasto, na przykład Berlin (Berlibry[18], 2008), Paryż czy jakiekolwiek białoruska miejscowość (Ziemliaki, aĺbo Bielaruskija limieryki[19] Rodacy, albo Białoruskie Limeryki, 2005) przedstawia postmodernistyczny zbiór przedmiotów, cytatów, cudzych kontekstów. Jest tam wszystko, nawet trzystrunowe gitary, łyżwy dla krótkowzrocznych i przeciwpancerne kalosze (Pajsci i nie viarnucca[20] Pójść i nie wrócić). Motywy takich wielopoziomowych i wielokontekstowych miast występują także w poezji młodego pokolenia. Odrębne miejsce zajmuje koncepcja ruchu współczesne miasto w białoruskiej poezji nie pozwala człowiekowi stać, tam wszystko się rusza metro, autobusy, tramwaje, poeci kreślą trasy przejazdów, wyznaczają przystanki w zgodzie z własnymi estetycznymi poglądami.

Niespodziewany obraz miasta pojawia się w twórczości Siarhieja Bałachonava. W powieści Imia hruszy[21](Imię gruszy, 2005) jest to niemal tak postmodernistyczny i pstry locus jak w wierszach Andreja Chadanovicza; z tą różnicą, że koncepcja miasta zaproponowana przez Siarhieja Bałachonava jest bardziej złożona to patchwork (jak wspomniany w powieści rodzaj kołdry zszytej z kawałków) sensów, kalejdoskop, który w zależności od punktu widzenia może pokazywać różne obrazki. Każda mistyczna próba interpretacji tego tworu staje się obiektem autorskiej ironii. W nowej książce Ziamlia pad krylami Fieniksa[22] (Ziemia pod skrzydłami Feniksa, 2012), która przybiera postać filmowego gatunku mockumentary, Siarhiej Bałachonau znowu prezentuje ironiczne, niemal karnawałowe obrazy miast, w których dochodzi do niewiarygodnych zdarzeń. Miasto przemienia się w poligon dla cudów i w tym samym momencie umożliwia zdeprecjonowanie pojęć niezgodnych z totalną ironią postmodernistycznej epoki. Jest to tym samym „wybijanie okien”, ale pozbawione już celów psychoterapeutycznych, z elementami trawestacji, jeden krok naprzód, który, oczywiście, przewiduje dalszy ruch.

***

Po długim milczeniu w literaturze miasto coraz pewniej umacnia w niej swoją pozycję. Zainteresowanie prozą urbanistyczną zwiększa się; im więcej powstaje utworów na ten temat, tym budzą większą ciekawość. Przykładowo, w ostatnim czasie szczególną popularnością cieszy się temat Mińska w czasie wojny. Wspomnienia i inne dokumentalne utwory o życiu w okupowanej przez niemieckie wojska białoruskiej stolicy są czytane i omawiane w Internecie. Mińsk lat sześćdziesiątych jest jednym z bohaterów powieści Uładzimira Niaklajeva Autamat z haziroukaj z siropam i biez, a także czytamy o nim w dokumencie Alaksandra Łukaszyka Slied matyka[23] (Ślad motylka, 2011, nominacja do Nagrody Literackiej imienia Jerzego Giedroyca), chociaż w książce tej miasto występuje bardziej jako tło dla historii o pobycie Lee Harvey Oswalda w białoruskiej stolicy. W powieści Uładzimira Niaklajeva ta sama postać, pojawiająca się wprawdzie pod pseudonimem Amerykanin, niespodziewanie staje się jednym z symboli Mińska lat sześćdziesiątych. Jednak poszukiwanie miasta w białoruskiej literaturze jeszcze nie jest zakończone. Widać, że temat ten jest daleki od wyczerpania i jeszcze przez długi czas będzie inspirować pisarzy różnych pokoleń.

, ,

Poszukując miasta


drukuj

Związek białoruskiej literatury z miastem nigdy nie był prosty. W tej nierównej relacji literatura niejednokrotnie uciekała do swoich niezliczonych kochanków miasteczek, chutorów, wiosek, porzucając miasto w sytuacji nie do pozazdroszczenia. Jednak miasto czekało. Brak zaufania w stosunku do niego jako miejsca, gdzie nic dobrego wydarzyć się nie może, wzbudzony u wuja Antosia po słynnej podróży do Wilna, opisanej przez Jakuba Kołasa w poemacie Nowa ziemia[1] (1923), literatura białoruska czule zachowała przy sobie niemal przez cały wiek XX. Las jest dobrym miejscem akcji, bo działają tam partyzanci. Wioska również, ponieważ tam nie traci się kontaktu z ziemią i zachowuje tradycyjne wartości. A miasto… Miasto to coś niepojętego,  miejsce, gdzie panuje hałas i zgiełk, które wysysa z człowieka życie; ono w ogóle nie istnieje, to mityczna przestrzeń, skąd do wioski przyjeżdżają wysocy rangą naczelnicy, żeby zorientować się w sytuacji i zaprowadzić porządek.

Nieśmiałe kroki w kierunku pojednania miasta i wsi zaczęto podejmować w połowie XX wieku. W 1966 roku ukazał się zbiór prozy Michasia Stralcoua Siena na asfalcie[2] (Siano na asfalcie), w którym bohater, do niedawna mieszkaniec wsi, próbuje oswoić się z miejską rzeczywistością, nadać jej sens i zjednać w sobie dwie dusze, których ucieleśnieniem są siano i asfalt. Koncepcja „siana na asfalcie” zakorzeniła się w białoruskiej literaturze tak silnie, że po upływie niemal pięćdziesięciu lat Festiwal Literacji imienia Stralcoua, który od ubiegłego roku ma swoje miejsce w Mińsku, a poświęcony jest miejskiej poezji (inną w białoruskiej literaturze znaleźć trudno), otrzymał nazwę „Vierszy na asfalcie”[3] („Wiersze na asfalcie”). Epoka „siana” po cichu przeminęła, jednak utrzymywała się dosyć długo i wyznaczała ową „dziwną wojnę” miasta i wioski, których literatura w żaden sposób nie mogła pojednać.

Czas sprzyjający miastu w białoruskiej literaturze nadszedł w latach dziewięćdziesiątych. Urbanistyczna proza, chociaż nie tak doniosła jak wszystkie wiejskie kroniki, pojawiła się na pierwszym planie i do dzisiaj broni swojej pozycji: Miasto mści się na wiosce za wszystkie lata zapomnienia i zaniedbania. Wprawdzie powstała jeszcze opowieść Andreja Fiedarenki Vioska[4] (Wioska), zdarza się, że bohaterowie opuszczają miasto, jednak ten ośrodek tradycyjnej kultury, jakim była dla pisarzy XX-wieczna wioska, przejawia się obecnie w literaturze jedynie jako atawizm. Nawet samego ośrodka tradycyjnej kultury już nie ma: wioska stała się miejscem, gdzie czas się zatrzymał. Dzisiaj na wsi nie dzieje się nic godnego uwagi. Dożywają tam swoich dni starzy ludzie oraz ci, którzy nie są w stanie płynąć pod prąd, to znaczy egzystować w bardziej dogodnym miejscu. Nie dziwi zatem fakt, że literatura wreszcie porzuciła wioskę i przeniosła się tam, gdzie wiruje życie i gdzie jest jeszcze komuś potrzebna. Przeniosła się do miasta.

Mińsk versus Wilno: stolica, której nie ma

Mimo że Mińsk stał się stolicą Białorusi (czy chociażby kraju, który mniej więcej odpowiada dzisiejszej Republice Białorusi) niemal sto lat temu, do niedawna białoruska literatura zarówno Mińska, jak i żadnego innego miasta nie obdarzała szczególną uwagą. O wiele łatwiej wymienić białoruskie utwory, w których tytułach występował na przykład Paryż: Razburyć Paryż[5] (Zburzyć Paryż) Valancina Akudovicza czy Stomlienasć Paryżam[6] (Zmęczenie Paryżem) Lieanida Drańko-Majsiuka. Oczywiście w Mińsku, w stolicy, rozgrywa się akcja wielu utworów z czasów sowieckich, ale żaden z nich nie bierze pod uwagę tego, co mogłoby stać się duchem miasta czy jego mitem. Mińsk to miasto szarych opowieści i szarych krajobrazów. Jest całkiem codzienny, jak stalinowski empire na prospekcie Niezalieżnaści [Niepodległości] (byłym prospekcie Francyska Skaryny) czy jak Pałac Republiki na placu Kastrycznickim. Niemożliwe jest stworzenie obrazu Mińska na podstawie utworów literatury epoki sowieckiej: rozpływa się i traci wszelką konkretność. Jedyne, co o nim wiem, to fakt, że jest miastem-bohaterem, że w czasie wojny (znów wojna!) byli tu działacze podziemia, mieszkali również Handlarka i Poeta (jest opowieść o takim tytule Ivana Szamiakina[7]). Fragmentarycznych informacji można jeszcze trochę podać. I podczas gdy Grodno to maleńki Paryż (znów Paryż!), gdy w Nieświeżu błąka się zjawa Czarnej Damy Barbary Radziwiłłówny, gdy Połock to miasto świętej Jeufrasinni i Soboru Mądrości Bożej w Połocku, zwanego też soborem św. Zofii, Mińsk jawi się jak miasto-zagadka, której tajemnicę zaczęto odkrywać całkiem niedawno.

 

Jeden z najciekawszych i najbardziej spójnych mitów, czy też już właściwie ukształtowanych wizerunków, Mińska zaprezentowany jest w albumie fotograficznym Artura Klinaua Horad SONca[8] (Miasto słońca, 2006), zawierającym około stu fotografii oraz esej, o tym samym tytule, w którym autor dowodzi, że Mińsk jest idealną ilustracją do Miasta słońca Tomasza Campanelli, jako jedyne w świecie Miasto Idealne komunistycznej utopii, jednolity produkt epoki sowieckiej, niemający sobie podobnych. Wartość Mińska, według Artura Klinaua, polega właśnie na tym, że jako jedyne miasto zdołał urzeczywistnić (przede wszystkim w swojej architekturze) plan generalny partii komunistycznej wobec urbanistycznego progresu. Rozwijając swoją teorię przez następne dwa lata, Artur Klinau wydał powieść Mińsk. Przewodnik po Mieście Słońca[9] próbę znalezienia sensu mińskiego mitu. Całkowicie z innej strony miasto to ujawnia się w powieści Uladzimira Niaklajeva Autamat z haziroukaj z siropam i biez[10] (Automat z wodą gazowaną z sokiem, albo bez), która ukazała się w ubiegłym roku, z podtytułem: Minski raman (Mińska powieść). Literatura wreszcie wynosi Mińsk na okładkę, ale podczas gdy Klinau próbuje opowiedzieć o mieście, które istnieje, lub je wymyślić, Niaklajeu opisuje Mińsk, którego już nie ma. Jedynie w literaturze to miasto, które odeszło w czasach powojennych, może istnieć. Bo gdy Mińska już nie ma, należy przyjąć to, co po nim zostało. Jak zaznaczyła w recenzji powieści Autamat z haziroukaj z siropam i biez Maryja Martysievicz pozostaje przyjąć mińszczan. Tutaj ujawnia się koncepcja podobna do myśli, którą Valancin Akudovicz przedstawił w eseju Miasto, którego nie ma[11]. Według niego Mińsk jest pozbawiony poetyckiej dominanty, tego punktu odniesienia w systemie przestrzeni współrzędnych, na którym mogłaby się oprzeć literatura, a także wyobraźnia dlatego jest to miasto pozbawione duszy. Mińsk nie ma własnej wieży Eiffla, Zamku Wawelskiego czy chociażby świątyni Hagia Sophia, właśnie dlatego miasto to może istnieć jedynie we wnętrzu każdego mieszkańca, który świadomie decyduje, czy chce tu być, czy nie. W konsekwencji miasto posiada sens tylko wtedy, gdy dostrzegają go ludzie. Bohater Uładzimira Niaklajeva ten sens widzi, bohaterowie Alhierda Bacharevicza, autora kolejnej zeszłorocznej powieści Szabany[12], nazwanej tak od dzielnicy, o kiepskiej reputacji, na obrzeżach Mińska nie dostrzegają go, dlatego stąd uciekają, dopiero o wiele później, zdając sobie sprawę z tego, że ani od zmęczonych Szaban, ani od samego Mińska uwolnić się nie zdołają.

 

Jednak, według Valancina Akudowicza, Mińsk to niejedyne miejsce, którego nie ma. Nie ma także  Wilna, tak silnie związanego z historią Białorusi, że współczesna literatura białoruska traktuje je jak swoją duchową Mekkę. Dziś dojechać z Mińska do Wilna można w trzy godziny. Dlatego nawet jeśli nie tam wydawana byłaby pierwsza białoruska gazeta „Nasza Niwa” i nie tam mieszkałoby wielu działaczy białoruskiego odrodzenia, Białorusini, regularnie przyjeżdżając do litewskiej stolicy a to po zakupy w „Akropolisie”, a to w celu odpoczynku, a to na koncert umieszczonego na „czarnej liście” Liavona Volskiego i tak wymyśliliby jakąś legendę, aby sprawić, by to miasto było choć troszeczkę ich. Jak już wspomniano, wuj Antoś bohater poematu Jakuba Kołasa Nowa ziemia Wilno odwiedził, ale zdecydowanie nie przypadło mu do gustu. Nie powstrzymało to Białorusinów, żeby chwycić się Wilna jak koła ratunkowego od razu po tym, gdy stało się to możliwe, czyli w latach dziewięćdziesiątych. Akcja wielu utworów współczesnej literatury białoruskiej rozgrywa się właśnie tam. I wszystko wskazuje na to, że tendencja ta w najbliższym czasie nie zaniknie. Zarówno w twórczości pisarzy starszego, jak i młodszego pokolenia Wilno wyobrażane jest jak miasto niemal mistyczne, miejsce, gdzie dochodzi do nadprzyrodzonych wydarzeń, na przykład podróży w czasie. In Vilnia veritas to tytuł tomu finalistów konkursu młodych literatów wydanego z okazji stulecia istnienia „Naszej Niwy”, który ukazał się w 2007 roku. Autorzy próbowali desakralizować mit o Wilnie jako białoruskiej Atlantydzie (Pabaczyć Vilniu i… prażać[13]  – Zobaczyć Wilno i…brechać Siroszki Pistonczyka). Fakt jednak pozostaje faktem w białoruskiej literaturze in Wilno naprawdę veritas.

 

Valancin Akudowicz w tymże eseju (Miasto, którego nie ma) na tle niemal mistycznej adoracji postrzega Wilno jako miasto-pułapkę. Stwierdza, że przez długi czas dawało i nadal daje nadzieję Białorusinom na uzyskanie miana stolicy kultury, która wyróżniałaby się oryginalnością i miała duszę. Lecz mijają stulecia, a nadzieja i tak się nie spełnia. Białoruscy pisarze ciągle osadzają swoich bohaterów i podmioty liryczne w Wilnie, aby przeżywali przygody i doznawali uczuć, ale przez to Wilno nie robi się bardziej białoruskie. Białoruskie Wilno to zamrożony projekt, który znajduje się w wiecznym stadium opracowywania.

 

Miasto wybitych okien

Niechęć do miasta, która w wielu przypadkach przeradzała się w całkowitą ignorancję, doprowadziła w końcu wieku XX do dość niespodziewanych konsekwencji. Mimo że do grona literatów zaczęło należeć coraz więcej osób, które urodziły się i dorastały w mieście i dlatego nie były emocjonalnie związane z wsią, w wielu utworach najnowszej literatury białoruskiej miasto pozostaje poczwarą i w coraz większym stopniu ulega demonizacji. W nowym, jeszcze bardziej przerażającym wizerunku pojawia się na stronach powieści czy opowiadań już nieprzypadkowo: jego obraz przyciąga coraz więcej uwagi autorów i zajmuje coraz więcej miejsca w utworach. Obecnie nie mieszkańcy wsi, ale miasta, którzy czują się dziećmi asfaltu, na którym już nie może być żadnego siana, odnoszą się do swojego miasta z rezerwą.

W kultowej powieści końca lat dziewięćdziesiątych Liubić nocz – prava pacukou[14] (Kochać noc – prawo pająków) Jurego Stankiewicza, pełnej ohydy, ksenofobii i ciemnych apokaliptycznych przepowiedni, wyrasta obraz wymyślonego prowincjonalnego miasteczka Janauska, pozbawionego swojskości i chaotycznego, które nie daje swoim mieszkańcom żadnej szansy na godne życie i kojarzy im się z bagnem. Wszystkie opisy pejzażu Janauska pokazują wyłącznie negatywne aspekty: rozbite okna, śmieci na ulicach, połamane ogrodzenia. Przyczynę upadku autor upatruje w okolicznościach historycznych, a przede wszystkim w zdradzie idei narodowej. Obraz błota znajduje się także w tomie opowiadań Evy Vieżnaviec Szliach drobnaj svolaczy[15] (Szlak drobnej swołoczy, 2008) i jest mocno akcentowany w twórczości Alhierda Bacharevicza. Jednak jest to zupełnie inne błoto niż u Jurego Stankiewicza. Właściwie jest to spóźniona odpowiedź na oficjalną literaturę sowiecką i na utwory, w których białoruska rzeczywistość jest idealizowana, a wszystko co białoruskie jest dobre. W wyniku tak zwanego wybijania szyb w rodzimym domu (wyrażenie to pojawiło się w burzliwych debatach, które ogarnęły media; oznacza zaprzeczenie „białoruskości” zawierającej się w takich pojęciach, jak: „rodzime”, „ojczyste”, „tradycyjne”) miasto nie mogło nie ucierpieć. Młoda generacja pisarzy odeszła od biernego zachwytu nad Białorusią jej historią, kulturą jedynie na podstawie tego, że tak jest przyjęte; próbowała świadomie obalić wcześniejsze modele, literackie wzorce i spojrzeć na rzeczywistość z nowego punktu widzenia. Obaleniu wszystkich możliwych mitów o Białorusi oraz jej literackiej desakralizacji sprzyjała sytuacja polityczna w kraju; pisarze wykorzystywali wszystkie możliwe sposoby, żeby podkreślić nieprawidłowości i absurd życia w nowych warunkach. Jak można było przewidzieć, pierwsze reakcje okazały się wyjątkowo ostre, w wyniku czego miasto w literaturze zmieniło się w miejsce straszne, niebezpieczne i przeklęte (Prakliatyja Hosci stalicy[16] Przeklęci goście stolicy Algierda Bacharevicza). Jednak obecnie koncepcja ta powoli zanika w literaturze. I nawet w powieści Szabany, poświęconej najbardziej mrocznej mińskiej dzielnicy, miasto przy całej swojej demoniczności staje się pewnym mistycznym tworem, gdzie mają miejsce, może i straszne, ale jednak cuda. W twórczości najmłodszego pokolenia białoruskich pisarzy, którzy weszli do literatury dosłownie w ostatnich latach, wizerunek miasta-demona przyjmowany jest już z dużą ironią i doprowadzany do absurdu. Dzisiaj, kiedy wszystkie okna w „rodzimym domu” są wybite, stare mity obalone, a wartości zweryfikowane, pozostaje jedno wymyślić coś nowego.

W mieście wszystko jest

Obecnie w mieście, jeśli wierzyć białoruskiej literaturze, można znaleźć absolutnie wszystko. Obok apokaliptycznych wizji truchła i rozpadu spotyka się też jasne, czasem fantazyjne, a czasem po prostu wesołe obrazy. Zdarzało się to także wcześniej, nawet za czasów Sowietów, o czym świadczy na przykład powieść Uładzimira Karatkiewicza Chrystus wylądował w Grodnie[17] (1972), w której miasto może nie jest głównym bohaterem, ale jest ważne na tyle, że autor uważał za konieczne umieszczenie go w tytule. W literaturze historycznej miasta w ogóle odgrywają bardzo ciekawą rolę służą za tło dla awanturniczych przygód (powieści historyczne w literaturze białoruskiej mają przede wszystkim charakter przygodowy), traktowane są jak drugi plan dla akcji, dlatego wymagają specjalnej ozdoby. Dla przykładu, w taki sposób obecnie upiększa się białoruskie miasta w czasie festiwalów rycerskich. Teatralny charakter miasta przejawia się w każdej powieści historycznej, niezależnie od tego, kiedy zostały napisane: u Uładzimira Karatkievicza w latach siedemdziesiątych, u Henryka Dalidovicza dziewięćdziesiątych czy u Ludmiły Rublieuskiej w 2000 roku.

W poezji Andreja Chadanovicza miasto, na przykład Berlin (Berlibry[18], 2008), Paryż czy jakiekolwiek białoruska miejscowość (Ziemliaki, aĺbo Bielaruskija limieryki[19] Rodacy, albo Białoruskie Limeryki, 2005) przedstawia postmodernistyczny zbiór przedmiotów, cytatów, cudzych kontekstów. Jest tam wszystko, nawet trzystrunowe gitary, łyżwy dla krótkowzrocznych i przeciwpancerne kalosze (Pajsci i nie viarnucca[20] Pójść i nie wrócić). Motywy takich wielopoziomowych i wielokontekstowych miast występują także w poezji młodego pokolenia. Odrębne miejsce zajmuje koncepcja ruchu współczesne miasto w białoruskiej poezji nie pozwala człowiekowi stać, tam wszystko się rusza metro, autobusy, tramwaje, poeci kreślą trasy przejazdów, wyznaczają przystanki w zgodzie z własnymi estetycznymi poglądami.

Niespodziewany obraz miasta pojawia się w twórczości Siarhieja Bałachonava. W powieści Imia hruszy[21](Imię gruszy, 2005) jest to niemal tak postmodernistyczny i pstry locus jak w wierszach Andreja Chadanovicza; z tą różnicą, że koncepcja miasta zaproponowana przez Siarhieja Bałachonava jest bardziej złożona to patchwork (jak wspomniany w powieści rodzaj kołdry zszytej z kawałków) sensów, kalejdoskop, który w zależności od punktu widzenia może pokazywać różne obrazki. Każda mistyczna próba interpretacji tego tworu staje się obiektem autorskiej ironii. W nowej książce Ziamlia pad krylami Fieniksa[22] (Ziemia pod skrzydłami Feniksa, 2012), która przybiera postać filmowego gatunku mockumentary, Siarhiej Bałachonau znowu prezentuje ironiczne, niemal karnawałowe obrazy miast, w których dochodzi do niewiarygodnych zdarzeń. Miasto przemienia się w poligon dla cudów i w tym samym momencie umożliwia zdeprecjonowanie pojęć niezgodnych z totalną ironią postmodernistycznej epoki. Jest to tym samym „wybijanie okien”, ale pozbawione już celów psychoterapeutycznych, z elementami trawestacji, jeden krok naprzód, który, oczywiście, przewiduje dalszy ruch.

***

Po długim milczeniu w literaturze miasto coraz pewniej umacnia w niej swoją pozycję. Zainteresowanie prozą urbanistyczną zwiększa się; im więcej powstaje utworów na ten temat, tym budzą większą ciekawość. Przykładowo, w ostatnim czasie szczególną popularnością cieszy się temat Mińska w czasie wojny. Wspomnienia i inne dokumentalne utwory o życiu w okupowanej przez niemieckie wojska białoruskiej stolicy są czytane i omawiane w Internecie. Mińsk lat sześćdziesiątych jest jednym z bohaterów powieści Uładzimira Niaklajeva Autamat z haziroukaj z siropam i biez, a także czytamy o nim w dokumencie Alaksandra Łukaszyka Slied matyka[23] (Ślad motylka, 2011, nominacja do Nagrody Literackiej imienia Jerzego Giedroyca), chociaż w książce tej miasto występuje bardziej jako tło dla historii o pobycie Lee Harvey Oswalda w białoruskiej stolicy. W powieści Uładzimira Niaklajeva ta sama postać, pojawiająca się wprawdzie pod pseudonimem Amerykanin, niespodziewanie staje się jednym z symboli Mińska lat sześćdziesiątych. Jednak poszukiwanie miasta w białoruskiej literaturze jeszcze nie jest zakończone. Widać, że temat ten jest daleki od wyczerpania i jeszcze przez długi czas będzie inspirować pisarzy różnych pokoleń.

O autorze:

Hanna Jankuta (ur. 1984) krytyk literacki, tłumacz z języka polskiego i angielskiego. Przełożyła na język białoruski poemat Świat Czesława Miłosza, Opowieść wigilijną Charlesa Dickensa, wiele utworów Edgara Allana Poe i innych. Pisze recenzje do czasopisma „Dziejaslou”, strony poświęconej Nagrodzie imienia Jerzego Giedroyca. Prowadzi rubrykę dotyczącą krytyki na stronie budzma.org.

Tłumaczenia na język polski:

Uładzimir Karatkiewicz, Chrystus wylądował w Grodnie, Oficyna 21.

Nie chyliłem czoła przed mocą. Antologia poezji białoruskiej od XV do XX wieku. Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego.

Pępek nieba. Antologia współczesnej poezji białoruskiej. Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego.

Suplement poetycki ze współczesnej liryki białoruskiej. Dom Kultury „Śródmieście”.

Andrej Chadanowicz. Święta Nowego Rocku. Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego.

Alhierd Bacharewicz. Talent do jąkania się. Opowiadania wybrane. Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego.

Artur Klinau. Mińsk. Przewodnik po Mieście Słońca. Czarne.

Ihar Babkou. Królestwo Białoruś. Interpretacja ru(i)n. Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego.



[1]              Якуб Колас, Новая зямля.

[2]              Міхась Стральцоў, Сена на асфальце.

[3]              Вершы на асфальце.

[4]              Андрэй Федарэнка, Вёска.

[5]              Валянцін Акудовіч, Разбурыць Парыж.

[6]              Леанід Дранько-Майсюк, Стомленасць Парыжам.

[7]              Іван Шамякін, Гандлярка і Паэт.

[8]              Артур Клінаў, Горан СОНца.

[9]              Артур Клінаў, Малая падарожная кніжка па Горадзе Сонца.

[10]             Уладзімір Някляеў, Аўтамат з газіроўкай з сіропам і без. Мінскі раман.

[11]             Валянцін Акудовіч, Горад, якога няма.

[12]             Альгерд Бахарэвіч, Шабаны.

[13]             Сірошка Пістончык, Пабачыць Вільню і… паржаць.

[14]             Юры Станкевіч, Любіць ноч — права пацукоў.

[15]             Ева Вежнавец, Шлях дробнай сволачы.

[16]             Альгерд Бахарэвіч, Праклятыя госці сталіцы.

[17]             Уладзімір Караткевіч, Хрыстос прызямліўся ў Гародні.

[18]             Андрэй Хадановіч, Берлібры.

[19]             Землякі, альбо Беларускія лімерыкі.

[20]             Пайсці і не вярнуцца.

[21]             Сяргей Балахонаў, Імя грушы.

[22]             Сяргей Балахонаў, Зямля пад крыламі Фенікса.

[23]             Аляксандр Лукашук, След матылька.

Originally published: http://kulturaenter.pl/poszukujac-miasta/2013/07/